Nurturing God’s Creation

Each spring, my wife and I find joy in feeding the birds that frequent our large rural Ottawa backyard. Together we peer out at our many-winged visitors through the kitchen window or separately through the patio doors. Species include beloved cardinals, chickadees, doves and nuthatches. Uninvited, yet equally welcome, guests are feisty red squirrels and their companion, more docile black squirrels.

Our love of nurturing nature in this simple way brings great joy.

While most of us understand the need to nurture God’s creation, helping people living on the margins may not always come so naturally. Judgement, criticism and stereotypes sometimes precludes caring for people in need. 

Street outreach organizations like Ottawa Innercity Ministries, however, look beyond ‘first impressions,’ scratching below the surface to the person underneath. They do so by sustaining life on the streets of our fair city and bring great joy to those in need.

Each day of the week, volunteers generously donate a couple of hours of their time to provide food, clothing and words of affirmation to our street friends. The outpouring of Jesus’ love and warmth during this brief interaction offers hope, which can enable the escape from the prison that is street life.

OIM conducts drop-ins, a youth art program and advocacy to those who grasp at this hope and seek a better life.

We know that these interventions bring with them joy through faith in a better future.

Isaiah 43 v 1: “Do not be afraid, for I have ransomed you. I have called you by name, you are mine.”

-Peter, Street Outreach Volunteer

Catching A Glimpse

My encounters with a new street friend from our weekly drop-in unfolded as many connections do. We had a few great conversations and OIM was able to assist him with some pressing needs. Eventually, though, he disappeared and I lost contact with him for a time. I could only hope that I was able to be a supportive connection point in his life.

Several months later I am sitting in a coffee shop and who comes over out of the blue, but my new street friend. He tells me how his life has changed and thanks us for being there for him. He then proceeds to pray, declaring a blessing and favour, as powerful as any prophetic word received.

I just want to honour God for dropping such a wonderful blessing that allowed me to catch just a glimpse of the increase he has brought to someone’s life and to know the small part I played in that. These are part of the moments that regenerate your tanks and strengthen your resolve. I pray that God will stretch my friend, and that the fruit of his boldness to share what the Lord has done for him, only increases.

-Rick, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless.

 

Ottawa Emergency Services – Thank You!

homelessnes in Ottawa | street outreachYou never know what to expect on street outreach. Some days are uneventful; others are not.

One chilly Sunday afternoon early in April our team crossed Dalhousie Street at Rideau. There in front of a popular cafe, amidst the hustle and bustle of shoppers, lay a big man.

No one else seemed to notice him.

It was disturbing to see someone seemingly asleep like this, especially for our two new team members. We knew he was in very bad shape. Under-dressed, unconscious and helpless on the cold floor of our concrete jungle, we weren’t sure of the cause.

However, our team leader took charge and tried to wake him, as OIM has trained us  to do. With few signs of life, his first thought was that the man had over-dosed and was dying. To administer Naloxone or not?

Weighing the odds, our quick thinker dialed  911 for medical assistance. Coincidentally a police cruiser stopped at the intersection and was approached by another member of our team.

The police promptly took over, checked the prostrate young man for vital signs and called for an ambulance.

Once the man was in the ambulance, when asked, one of the paramedics said Naloxone was not warranted in this situation as an (opioid) overdose did not seem to be the issue. We were thankful for their timely response and expert care.

Just as the ambulance arrived,  a fire truck pulled up to offer assistance and another could be heard approaching rapidly.

All of this happened within ten minutes. Needless to say, we were impressed with our Ottawa emergency services and thankful that our friend had been well taken care of so quickly.

 

-Peter, Street Outreach Volunteer

 

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs including a permanent location for our OIM Office as of Aug 1 .

Thanks and God Bless.

 

Building Relationships On The Street

Building relationships with those experiencing poverty and homelessness is a cornerstone of our ministry. So when I have the privilege of getting to know someone on a deeper level, I count it a real blessing.

One of those individuals who I have met while on street outreach is “Bob.” Bob has been living on the streets for many years. I count it a blessing that he seeks me out for conversation. I know that Bob lives in difficult circumstances as he carries his entire life on his back with the occasional reprieve when he can find a safe location to hide away his belongings.

We have some very interesting conversations as Bob’s outlook on life is quite unique. Bob, though, never gets angry or refuses to listen when I discuss Jesus and the topic of religion. In fact, we could all take a lesson in manners and upbeat, positive behaviour from him. I know some of the difficulties of Bob’s life and, yet, he still always manages to show a smile, crack a joke and share something encouraging. It warms my heart to see it. Bob has, in our more intimate conversations, told me that he admits to having a dark side, but most of the time he can push it aside and find a glass half full.

I am truly honoured to know my friend Bob and count it a privilege to share the love of Jesus on the streets.

-Rick, Staff

 

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs including a permanent location for our OIM Office as of Aug 1 .

Thanks and God Bless.

Is there someone out there who cares?

God humbled my pride one night when I met two homeless individuals while on street outreach. Both had experienced tremendous loss. The first was sitting with some Listerine bottles partially hidden away. With a gruff tone, he told us he had lost a friend to overdose recently. The second individual told us he had lost his brother, but he would not share any details.

When someone from the street experiences loss, their own isolation and marginalization is often compounded with the question: Does anyone really care?

Their pain was very real and tangible. In fact when I made the mistake of saying ‘I’m sorry.’ The response from both was a few expletive words wrapped around, ‘what do you care?’ Their comments really struck a nerve with me. I really did empathize with what they were going through. But how do I share with them that they are not alone and that someone does care?

While I genuinely care, I also realize that words often fall short of the mark.

My deepest prayer is that God will show his overwhelming love and never-ending commitment to these men.

– Rick, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless You.

God of the Ordinary

“Do you have room for one more?” he asked gently.

It was the end of the day at our drop-in and I was getting ready to clean up the Foot Care Station. I had been there for four hours, cleaning and massaging feet. I was tired. My hands ached. “Of course I have room,” I replied. His eyes sparkled with gratitude. I proceeded to fill the foot basin with water, Epsom salts, and soap. He carefully removed his worn shoes and dirty socks, ashamed as he revealed his soiled feet. I pretended not to notice.

Then he soaked his feet and we began to talk.  

We discussed the weather, his ‘job’ collecting empty bottles, and our mutual love of cats.

 Twenty minutes later, his feet had been cleaned, massaged, and clad with a fresh pair of socks. As he got up to leave, he turned to me and said, “y’know, I wasn’t having a very good day, but I just want you to know that you’ve turned my day right around.” He smiled and walked away.

I never saw him again.

Now, 10 years later, I’ve met hundreds from our street community. Yet this brief interaction touches me still. I don’t fully comprehend its impact, but one thing I know for sure:  it has served as God’s reminder that He delights in using ordinary people, engaged in ordinary acts of service to touch people’s lives each and every day.

– Jelica, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless You.

 

 

The Kindness of Human Contact

On a recent family vacation to BC, we witnessed polite but dishevelled panhandlers plying their trade amidst the more decidedly destitute segment of the population, all passive against the throb of the downtown core of that province’s largest city.

In front of the exquisite old railway station and among the edgy new commercial buildings, we found them.

Similarly I saw disadvantaged people in Cincinnati and Shreveport.

They seem to stand out, as icons of another world in which, save for circumstances and choices, we too could share. Perhaps it’s the starkness of winter in the cold and grey inner city landscape that makes them more noticeable.

The homeless are systemic to the “human condition” for a variety of reasons. But few are on the streets because they want to be.

Some are victims, sometimes avoidably so. Many are mentally or emotionally challenged.

However, the vast majority of our street friends silently long to engage in an authentic relationship with someone who cares.

We help simply by lending an ear or sharing a kind word during short encounters on the streets of our nation’s capital.

It takes only a few moments, yet it soothes an ache that only those of us who understand and are willing can relieve.

God’s love, as demonstrated by the kindness of human contact, inspires hope.

Simply being a small part of a less fortunate person’s day can make an immeasurable difference in their lives.

 

1 Corinthians 14 verse 13: “Three things will last forever – faith, hope and love – and the greatest of these is love.”

 

Peter, Street Outreach Volunteer

 

 

An Unexpected Encounter

I want to share a short, but quite wonderful, blessing I received from my street-engaged friend named ‘Bob.’

When you are on the streets, you are surrounded by many difficult stories and so much pain, so when a blessing erupts in your ministry it’s an amazing thing. The feeling you get is that of God just dropping a wonderful nugget in your lap to bless you.

Bob is a friend I first met at out drop-in and we also had a few connections at our stop-in. We had talked and shared during these times and things unfolded as many connections do. We at OIM, as always, helped where we could with Bob’s needs. I eventually lost contact with him for several months, so I just had to be content with the fact that I was able to plant or water by being a supportive connection point in his life.

Now, several months later, I am sitting in a coffee shop and who comes over, but Bob! Out of the blue he tells me how his life has changed and he thanked us for being there for him. He then proceeds to pray over me, declaring a blessing and favour, as powerful as any prophetic word received.

So I just want to honour God for dropping such a wonderful blessing in seeing the fruit of the increase he has brought to someone’s life and in knowing the small part I played in that. These are part of the moments that regenerate your tanks and strengthen your resolve. I pray that God continues to grow and stretch my friend Bob, and that the fruit of his boldness to pray for and share what the Lord has done for him, only increases in his life. 

 

Rick, Staff

 

 

Conversation at the Drop-In

 

“I’ve been on my own a long time. I left home when I was 10. Been on my own ever since.”

Edward told me this as we sat together in the drop-in.  He is about 65, with tired but kind eyes. He is a quiet, gentle man who can be easily missed in the large drop-in crowd.But he always nods his head hello with a smile.  

I can only imagine the kind of childhood home that would make a 10 year old run away. He said recently he tried to reach out to his remaining family members, but they wanted nothing to do with him. He had tears in his eyes as he told me is all alone in this world.

I couldn’t help but think of the youth I work with, and how many of them have recently left home and are just starting out on their own. I told Edward that it was amazing that, despite what he’s been through, and despite not having a family, he has maintained a gentle and loving spirit. There doesn’t seem to be an ounce of bitterness in him.  I told him that he gives me hope for the young people I know who have just left their families.  

“It’s God. God gives me hope.” 

He said, “I know that God loves me and wants me here. I can’t read the Bible, but I know God loves me.”

“Why can’t you read the Bible?” I asked – foolishly thinking maybe he didn’t have a Bible.  

“I can’t read. But I can feel God around me. I know He’s here.”

It was a beautiful moment, listening to Edward talk about his faith.

A faith that trusts in the presence of God,

even in times of loneliness.

A faith that believes in a loving Father,

even in times of abandonment.

“Mountains” | a Poem by Street Poet ‘Stan’

Most of our street friends are respectful of our overtures to assist them with food, warm clothing and kind words of encouragement. Many are cheerful, despite their homelessness, addictions or traumas. 

Some seem helpless and solely dependent upon one or more of the many institutions, like Ottawa Innercity Ministries (OIM), whose support is freely and willingly available to them.  

Often, OIM outreach teams come across those whose friendly banter and hopeful smiles make our simple acts of kindness extremely rewarding.

Recently, seated on the sidewalk on a cold winter’s afternoon in front of the Rideau Centre, a young man named ‘Stan’ (not his real name) displayed all of these signs of outward appreciation. But in his own small way he exemplified God’s love as can only be found on the street by giving our team something he created himself; a poem of hope called “Mountains” as follows: 

 

Mountains have snow-capped tops

Along its’ ridges many jagged rocks

This makes for difficult terrain

But I want to climb one all the same

 

Maybe just to say I did

But more to conquer the fears I’ve hid

There is always the chance that you could fall

And from this height it could end it all

 

You can’t have these thoughts in your mind

Or the law of attraction must abide

So get out there and give it a shot

And see the view from a mountain top

 

Your whole perspective just might change

Once you remove the fears and doubts from your brain.

 

Peter, Street Outreach Volunteer