Thank You Value Village!

Thank you for your generosity, Value Village!

OIM receiving donations from Value Village, Kanata, on Hazeldean Rd.

Did you know that for the past few years OIM has been the grateful recipient of clothing and footwear from Value Village in Kanata?

Every second week, OIM Volunteers Judy and Wendy pick up 4 large boxes and/or bags of seasonal clothing and footwear that are promptly delivered to our Tuesday drop-in at Knox Presbyterian Church in downtown Ottawa.

This has been a tremendous blessing for our Drop-In guests!

Each Tuesday, as the doors of our Drop-In open at 10am, the first place many go to is our Clothing Room. Everything is FREE and there is always a line-up to get into the room!

Whether someone is in need of a T-shirt in the summer, a pair of jeans in the fall, or warm coat in the winter, there is often a variety to choose from for young and old alike.  And whether an individual needs their Social Assistance dollars to stretch a bit further or a visitor has nothing but a backpack filled with their worldly possessions, the Drop-In Clothing Room has become a valuable source of help in times of need.

The privilege of being able to give what we have is, in no small measure, due to the generosity of our community of support, among whom is Value Village, Kanata. 

While OIM is ALWAYS in need of clothing and footwear, gladly receiving from the community, it goes without saying that the donations we receive from Value Village are a tremendous help especially in these times as the need on the streets seems only to increase.

This is why we feel especially blessed to be in partnership with Value Village who also partners with other charities in the community through their “Get To Give Program.”

Here is a special note from our Value Village partner in Kanata about this very special program:

Value Village continues to support the Ottawa Innercity Ministries as part of our Get to Give Program. This cycle of giving allows us to take unsold items from our sales floor and distribute them in the community where they’re really needed. Your unwanted goods can do a world of good for our community. Donating your gently- used clothing and household items to support the Ontario Federation of Cerebral Palsy at the Community Donation Centre at the Value Village located at 5487 Hazeldean Road, Kanata; will support their local programs supporting independence, inclusion, choice  and full integration of all persons with Cerebral Palsy. Value Village pays the Ontario Federation of Cerebral Palsy for every item donated.

Drop off hours:

  • Monday to Saturday: 9:00am to 9:00pm
  • Sunday: 10:00am- 7:00pm
  • Ontario Federation of Cerebral Palsy: 1-800-226-8464
  • Value Village (Kanata): 613-836-1549

Our thanks to Value Village for all the good work you do!

 

– Jelica, Staff

 

 

 

Community BBQ

Our Administrative Assistant, Gaby, is normally busy working at the office.  But recently, she had the opportunity to visit our drop-in on BBQ Day!

It was a fun day with plenty of hamburgers, hot dogs, sides, dessert and beverages to go around. Everyone was so appreciative of the community donations that came in so that we could organize this special event for our street community.

Blog post – Gaby

 

Gaby was happy to be there, helping serve, visiting with people, and seeing some of our street friends who visit the office.

I recently asked her about her experience at the drop-in that day, and this is what she said:

“What I sensed was a real community: People know each other, clients, volunteers and staff alike, and genuinely enjoy each other’s company. For some of the ladies there, they told me it’s their only outing. It gives them an opportunity to see their friends and be a part of a caring community.”

I couldn’t have said it better myself.

– Jelica, Staff

Catching A Glimpse

My encounters with a new street friend from our weekly drop-in unfolded as many connections do. We had a few great conversations and OIM was able to assist him with some pressing needs. Eventually, though, he disappeared and I lost contact with him for a time. I could only hope that I was able to be a supportive connection point in his life.

Several months later I am sitting in a coffee shop and who comes over out of the blue, but my new street friend. He tells me how his life has changed and thanks us for being there for him. He then proceeds to pray, declaring a blessing and favour, as powerful as any prophetic word received.

I just want to honour God for dropping such a wonderful blessing that allowed me to catch just a glimpse of the increase he has brought to someone’s life and to know the small part I played in that. These are part of the moments that regenerate your tanks and strengthen your resolve. I pray that God will stretch my friend, and that the fruit of his boldness to share what the Lord has done for him, only increases.

-Rick, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless.

 

God of the Ordinary

“Do you have room for one more?” he asked gently.

It was the end of the day at our drop-in and I was getting ready to clean up the Foot Care Station. I had been there for four hours, cleaning and massaging feet. I was tired. My hands ached. “Of course I have room,” I replied. His eyes sparkled with gratitude. I proceeded to fill the foot basin with water, Epsom salts, and soap. He carefully removed his worn shoes and dirty socks, ashamed as he revealed his soiled feet. I pretended not to notice.

Then he soaked his feet and we began to talk.  

We discussed the weather, his ‘job’ collecting empty bottles, and our mutual love of cats.

 Twenty minutes later, his feet had been cleaned, massaged, and clad with a fresh pair of socks. As he got up to leave, he turned to me and said, “y’know, I wasn’t having a very good day, but I just want you to know that you’ve turned my day right around.” He smiled and walked away.

I never saw him again.

Now, 10 years later, I’ve met hundreds from our street community. Yet this brief interaction touches me still. I don’t fully comprehend its impact, but one thing I know for sure:  it has served as God’s reminder that He delights in using ordinary people, engaged in ordinary acts of service to touch people’s lives each and every day.

– Jelica, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless You.

 

 

An Unexpected Encounter

I want to share a short, but quite wonderful, blessing I received from my street-engaged friend named ‘Bob.’

When you are on the streets, you are surrounded by many difficult stories and so much pain, so when a blessing erupts in your ministry it’s an amazing thing. The feeling you get is that of God just dropping a wonderful nugget in your lap to bless you.

Bob is a friend I first met at out drop-in and we also had a few connections at our stop-in. We had talked and shared during these times and things unfolded as many connections do. We at OIM, as always, helped where we could with Bob’s needs. I eventually lost contact with him for several months, so I just had to be content with the fact that I was able to plant or water by being a supportive connection point in his life.

Now, several months later, I am sitting in a coffee shop and who comes over, but Bob! Out of the blue he tells me how his life has changed and he thanked us for being there for him. He then proceeds to pray over me, declaring a blessing and favour, as powerful as any prophetic word received.

So I just want to honour God for dropping such a wonderful blessing in seeing the fruit of the increase he has brought to someone’s life and in knowing the small part I played in that. These are part of the moments that regenerate your tanks and strengthen your resolve. I pray that God continues to grow and stretch my friend Bob, and that the fruit of his boldness to pray for and share what the Lord has done for him, only increases in his life. 

 

Rick, Staff

 

 

Conversation at the Drop-In

 

“I’ve been on my own a long time. I left home when I was 10. Been on my own ever since.”

Edward told me this as we sat together in the drop-in.  He is about 65, with tired but kind eyes. He is a quiet, gentle man who can be easily missed in the large drop-in crowd.But he always nods his head hello with a smile.  

I can only imagine the kind of childhood home that would make a 10 year old run away. He said recently he tried to reach out to his remaining family members, but they wanted nothing to do with him. He had tears in his eyes as he told me is all alone in this world.

I couldn’t help but think of the youth I work with, and how many of them have recently left home and are just starting out on their own. I told Edward that it was amazing that, despite what he’s been through, and despite not having a family, he has maintained a gentle and loving spirit. There doesn’t seem to be an ounce of bitterness in him.  I told him that he gives me hope for the young people I know who have just left their families.  

“It’s God. God gives me hope.” 

He said, “I know that God loves me and wants me here. I can’t read the Bible, but I know God loves me.”

“Why can’t you read the Bible?” I asked – foolishly thinking maybe he didn’t have a Bible.  

“I can’t read. But I can feel God around me. I know He’s here.”

It was a beautiful moment, listening to Edward talk about his faith.

A faith that trusts in the presence of God,

even in times of loneliness.

A faith that believes in a loving Father,

even in times of abandonment.

A Place of Third Chances

With his long, white flowing hair pulled back in a ponytail, Simon walked into our drop-in and back into our lives, eager to “give back” as he put it. As Simon explained, he had been released from prison and was getting his life back together. Estranged from his ex-wife and with a 14-year-old daughter to raise, Simon did not want alcohol or his past troubles to hold him down…again.

That’s because this was his third time around.

Having taken the next steps to go through an alcohol treatment program and transition into a community living facility with employment-readiness training, Simon was finally looking forward to the future. “My graduation from the treatment program is tomorrow,” he beamed. “I was up at 5:30 this morning writing my graduation speech – seven pages so far!”

Simon’s sense of accomplishment was evident.

But so was his desire to move forward. “I need to stay busy. I want to get a part-time job and to start volunteering at OIM.” We were happy to welcome him, to come alongside him in his journey back to health and stability. “You guys were there for me when I needed it,” he told us, “and now I want to give back.”

It was gratifying to know that Simon felt welcomed at our drop-in (not an easy thing for ex-offenders to find in any community, as you can imagine). But, there he was, helping us set up, serve lunch, and tear down at the end of the day.

He was in a place where he felt welcome to start over (again).  And while the road to stability is not easy, often paved with setbacks and disappointments, giving ourselves – and others – permission to make some mistakes along the way can make all the difference.

 

Jelica, Staff

 

 

A Humbling Experience

Recently, a few of us were talking about people we had met through the drop in and where they were. I talked about John, a man that I had met over 15 years ago when we ran our drop in out of another location downtown. John was a homeless man who had his challenges being homeless with mental illness issues. He was a flamboyant individual, colourful, always had an opinion and was willing to discuss any current topic and extremely political. (If he could have found a way to control his mental illness, I do believe he would have made an attempt to become a politician. But that is another story.)

John’s colourful dress reflected his mood and his outlook. I had once told him he reminded me of a peacock because he always had feathers in his hat and he was brightly dressed. I didn’t mean it as an insult and he didn’t take it that way. It sparked a friendship that has lasted many years…

During Christmas of 2005 my father died, predeceased by mother in 1994 and both in the month of December which makes the period of Christmas hard for me.

In May 2006 I am outside the drop in and in a real depressed mood. We had just put dad in the ground and I am dealing with a lot of emotions; guilt, everything associated with the loss of your last parent. With no close family nearby to talk to I am isolated, with my only siblings in British Columbia. John comes up to me pushing his grocery cart filled with his worldly possessions and sees that I am depressed and asks me what is wrong and I tell him. No one else has picked up on this, or if they have they haven’t asked.

He leans over and very quietly says to me, “I have been there brother. I know exactly what you are going through. I am here for you if you need to talk.” He reaches out, squeezes my shoulder, looks me in the eye and something passes between us that can’t be expressed in words. Tears flow and I mumble ‘thanks.’

Every week I give up my time for the homeless, the marginalized, to support them. And, here, it took a homeless man to recognize my pain and hurt and to provide me the one thing I needed: unconditional love. I was humbled, I was loved and I learned a lesson that I have never forgotten.

Love comes in all sizes, shapes and forms. We just need to learn to recognize it and accept it.

 

Ken B, Volunteer

 

 

THE ‘BOB’ SERIES: A Mighty Man Hidden

I trust you are enjoying our little get-togethers. I find myself again wanting to share with you about a friend named Bob. (As I will always share, for the sake of anonymity, everyone in this series of posts will be named Bob. This will be my standard opening, so I trust you will be patient with me.)

Back to “Bob.”

Bob is a wonderful guy. He’s articulate, engaging in conversation. He presents that air of an intellectual, but not stuffy or arrogant; just genuinely interested in conversation that goes deeper than the weather. I have sat and talked with Bob several times, and enjoy our conversations very much.

In honesty, I am still waiting for the opportunity for our conversations to get personal. Not just theological about Faith and Christ, but where trust and opportunity will present themselves in time. The reason I am mentioning Bob here is that I truly wonder what set of circumstances has brought him to the place where access to a self-sustaining life is limited and the need for support is high.

We are so fortunate at OIM to be able to support and come alongside our friends like Bob.

As for Bob’s life, with many trauma survivors their ability to guard and protect themselves is highly developed, so he has only shared small bits of that part of his life with me so far. In appearance and conversation though, Bob would fit very comfortably within any social environment. He also applies action to words: whenever he sees that I need help with drop-in duties I don’t need to ask. He just steps in and lends a hand. Bob’s heart and desire to contribute and make a difference in life is evident, even though we run into the big “BUT” that drowns his potential. Bob is quite a paradox and I am genuinely blessed to have met him. I pray also that God brings a revelation of Christ into his life because Bob has so much potential to give and impact the life of others.

Rick O, Staff

What if it was you?

Valentines Day Week – just passed. Kudos to all of our volunteer outreach workers in all capacities: street outreach, drop in, office drop in, prayer partners, donors, those who cook for our event dinners, the ones that donate sleeping bags and all kinds of other goodies that we use as tools to make connections with those who live and breathe on the streets of our city.

Sometimes, just sometimes, our street outreach volunteers might walk their routes in minus 30 degrees, and come back feeling somewhat disappointed because on this cold night, they only saw a couple of street friends. Then the thoughts come, “I wonder if I am making all that much difference anyhow. It doesn’t feel like it tonight at least.”

Stop. Pause.

What if it was you?

You on the streets, maybe even on that one cold night when no one much pays you any attention really, and you feel invisible, forgotten, neglected, and abandoned. Then the recurring thoughts from your past come: thoughts of ‘no good’, you’ll never amount to anything, you are not really worth the effort…

Then an outreach worker shows up with a sandwich, a juice box, but more importantly, a smile, an inquiry about your week, a reminder of something that you said last week or time when you last connected, and some random (or planned) word of encouragement that really lifted your spirits…

How would that make you feel?

For the one’s and two’s and groups on the streets, and the teams of two or three volunteers walking and watching-  add these together and you have two: one, a great deal of difference in someone(s) life; and two, ‘everything’ (and all that entails) to our those who call the streets their home.

A small thing for us maybe, but what if it was ‘you?’ I know it would mean a lot to me.

Ken MacLaren