Community is more than gathering together

It is no secret that building relationships and trust is what OIM is all about.

Four times each week, groups of youth and young adults gather to sing, share, create art and support each other. The youth greet each other with hugs and catch up with volunteer Mentors who are always interested in hearing what’s going on in their lives.

When ‘Social Distancing’ came into existence along with the reality we would not be able to meet together, we felt helpless.  We actually felt we were abandoning the youth who have come to trust and depend on us.

White Border with Photo Greeting Birthday Facebook PostWe quickly adapted and started reaching out through Social Media and texting.  We sent a card to each youth, telling them we missed them and were thinking of them. We also were able to include a grocery gift card. Volunteer Mentors began meeting remotely with youth, offering one-on-one check-ins on a weekly basis. And, staff were only a phone call away for crisis intervention if needed. Small steps for us, but huge for our youth.

The message?  “We care about you.” “We miss you.” “You are important to us.”

Here are just a couple of replies:

“Thank you for just being there for us and help keeping us all sane and safe.”

“The card meant more to me than the gift card did. It had me crying because of  how much you guys actually do for us.”

While staff were trying to show the youth that we care about them, the youth were turning it right back on us! They would send us messages asking how WE were coping, asking about how the VOLUNTEERS are doing, and saying that they were thinking of  US!

This touched us deeply, and more, brought us immense comfort.  We were missed, cared for and valued in a time when we ourselves are feeling fearful, uncertain and overwhelmed.

Community is more than gathering together – it is being missed when you are away.  When someone reaches out and says, “I am missing you,” it deeply touches our hearts. Even while we are absent from each other, we can still connect – and it works both ways.

~Moira (Staff)

He Fought Like a Soldier

On Jan 15, OIM launches a NEW Innercity Veterans Outreach & Support Service (DETAILS BELOW).

Over the coming weeks and months, we will be sharing veteran and volunteer perspectives on the issues facing our homeless and at-risk veterans. 

Every Tuesday for the last several years, you could always count on Marcel to greet you at the drop-in. Walking in first thing in the morning (with a Tim Horton’s cup in hand, of course), he would make his way to his regular table, but not without first greeting each staff member and volunteer.

He had a special connection with two of our volunteers: Ken and Kirk, who are both veterans. You see, Marcel was a proud veteran himself – having served in the Canadian military for several years. But like so many other veterans, after leaving the military he felt lost. He struggled with alcoholism for years, which eventually led him to the streets. But Marcel was a strong man, who persevered. He fought to get off the alcohol and to reclaim his life. He got sober and got a small apartment. But even after surviving homelessness, his life was not easy. He struggled daily with depression and PTSD. But he fought. He fought like a soldier.

One Tuesday at the drop-in, Marcel did not show up to greet us. One of his friends brought us the news that he had died suddenly over the weekend due to a heart condition. There were tears shed, as friends comforted each other.

Although years have passed since his death, the OIM community is remembers Marcel. We remember his courage and his resilience.

We thank him for his service.

And we will miss him dearly.

Marcel at the drop-in

Marcel at the drop-in

 


If you are a homeless or at-risk veteran, or know someone who is, you are welcome to attend OIM’s,

INNERCITY VETERANS OUTREACH & SUPPORT 

Wednesdays, 10 to 11:30 am

OIM Office,  391 Gladstone Ave.

We offer a safe community and one-on-one support in a welcoming environment.

Available services:

Access to resources & literature

Access to phone & computer

Individualized support

Recreational activities

Refreshments & more

For more information:

Contact Rick at rick_oim@rogers.com or call our office at (613)237-6031

Above and Beyond

wednesday team

Wednesday night team on the first snowy night of the season.

When OIM staff pack up for the day and lock the doors at 4pm, we know that OIM’s day is not over. Each evening, a team of volunteers will come in and pack up the outreach wagons, and then venture out onto the streets to connect with people and provide much needed supplies. 

I’m in the office several evenings each week for our youth programs – so I’m lucky enough to cross paths with many of outreach volunteers. What I’ve noticed is that many of our volunteers do special and thoughtful things as they pack up their outreach wagons.

I get to see Rose, as she packs a small zip lock bag full of tea bags for Larry, who appreciates this gesture each week.

And Jess, who made sure to buy Halloween candy when it was on sale so she will have treats to hand out.

And Doug, who brings a thermos full of hot chocolate on the really cold nights so he can offer a warm drink to our friends.

And Laura, who writes down the name of every person she connects with on the street, and prays for them by name when she returns to the office.

I feel honoured to witness these acts of love. We are so lucky to have such kind and dedicated volunteers who go above and beyond each night. As the winter approaches, pray for our teams who go out no matter the weather. And pray for the folks they meet on the street, that they may feel the love the outreach volunteers have in their hearts, and they may find safety this winter.

The 52-Hertz Whale

Have you ever met someone who is just amazing at remembering names?

That person who you met once 3 years ago, who remembers your name as soon as they see your face. And you feel bad as you frantically skim your internal Rolodex trying to remember their name.

the-whale-2464799_1920That’s Ash.  Ash remembers everyone’s name. Even people she briefly meets. She often remembers details about them too. “Yeah we met that one time last year. You were wearing a red sweater and we talked about the election.”

“How do you do that?” I asked her once.

She shrugged. But in the next breath she said “No one ever remembers me. So I just want to make sure I always remember other people.”

Ash only shares snippets from her childhood. But these snippets show a lot of trauma.  She told me once “I grew up feeling like a consequence…the result of my mom’s bad decision. I was bounced around between relatives. And they always made sure I knew what I was – a consequence.”

She did not have loving, supportive people in her life. In fact, she had a lot of people in her life who actively hurt her. 

Yet she makes an effort to treat people with respect and love.  She greets people by name, with a smile and usually a hug.

“I don’t think anyone would blame you for completely giving up on people. But you haven’t – that’s pretty incredible.” I said. 

“Have you ever heard of the 52 hertz whale?” She asked me – I shook my head no.

“You know how whales communicate with each other using sounds frequencies? Well there is this one whale that has a frequency of 52 hertz. It’s the only whale in the ocean with this sound. So no other whales can hear it. It’s called the loneliest whale because it swims around all alone because no other whales  can hear it.

Sometimes I feel like that whale, like I’m destined to be alone. But then I watched a documentary on it. And even though it’s been alone all its life, it keeps calling out as it swims around the ocean. It keeps looking for other whales who can hear it. It doesn’t give up. So I guess I’m like that. I haven’t given up.” she said.

Sometimes when I meet with a youth I feel like I am meeting with a wise elder who is teaching me valuable life lessons. The resilience in Ash is astounding, and her willingness to connect with people despite what she’s been through brings so much hope in a world that is often so disconnected.

 

 

Innercity Arts Mural

 

Innercity Arts was invited to paint a mural at 206 Main St. First, they needed to come up with a concept. Mique Michelle, a local artist, helped guide a group session so the young artists could share their ideas. There were many important issues they wanted to highlight – including mental health, youth homelessness, equality, acceptance and unity. One youth mentioned civil rights activist Marsha P. Johnson, as someone who embodied many of these issues. She herself was homeless, worked in the sex trade, and dedicated her life to helping others. 

After coming up with a design, more than 25 young people from Innercity Arts had 3 days to paint a mural. The mural included a cardinal (which are common in the area), bright flowers (which were Marsha P. Johnson’s signature hair style), a yellow star (representing STAR house, a homeless shelter for LGBTQ youth that Marsha started) and a quote from Marsha P. Johnson. 

“How many years does it take for people to see that we’re all brothers and sisters and human beings in the human race?”  

 

Watch the video below to see how it all came together!  

Go to 206 Main St. to see it in person! 

 

Special thanks to Crime Prevention Ottawa for funding this project! 

Colour Outside of the Lines

Colour-Outside-The-LinesThe world is full of high expectations. Get a higher education they say, then drive this year’s model high end car and get a job with a large firm.
 
The bar is set so high; it’s unattainable for most. What if – just for a brief moment – one’s value came from simply being the best version of oneself? 
 
Every single one of us was woven in our mother’s womb by the very skilled and loving hand of God. Each and every one of our lives designed for a specific and wonderful plan and purpose…none of which has anything to do with material objects or high social standards. The bravest, most honest, resilient, kind and loving people I have the joy of being in community with posses none of the things the world says they should. 
 
On Monday mornings the Innercity Freedom Group meets to support and lean on one another in a safe place, sharing whatever is buggin’ us.
 
We watch a video and do some cool art to express ourselves. Here we have no set bars or standards, we just take the 1st steps to living life One Day At A Time. Here we encourage each other to colour outside of the lines and celebrate it!
 
  • Innercity Freedom Group meets Monday mornings from 10-11:30am.

 

~Bonnie, Staff

 

 

 

A Tough Night

It was a particularly rough start to the night at Innercity Arts. One of the youth had arrived in distress, suffering from a mental health crisis and inebriation. His behaviour was out of control and his health was in danger – so we made the decision to call paramedics.

Like so many other young people on the streets, this young man became afraid and agitated when he saw the flashing lights of police and ambulance. We tried our best to keep him calm and reassure him that he was safe. It was so difficult to watch as he yelled and struggled with the paramedics who were trying so hard to help him.

From the corner of my eye, I could see several peers from Innercity Arts watching quietly. I sensed that they were guarding their young friend, making sure he was not being mistreated.

When the ambulance left with the young man, I approached the group to make sure they were okay.

“I know that must have been hard to see your friend like that”, I said.

“Actually, we wanted to make sure YOU were okay,” one replied.

Surprised, I questioned “Me?”

“Yeah, you looked to sad. We just wanted to make sure you were okay,” one said.

“When I saw how upset you looked, I thought wow, you guys must really care about us,” another said.

It is amazing how one moment my heart was aching, seeing a young person in such distress. And in the next moment, I was being comforted by the very youth I was there to comfort! I am constantly amazed by the capacity young people on the streets have to show compassion and caring for others, even when they have so much going on in their lives. I am so thankful for this community.  

The greatness of a community is most accurately measured by the compassionate actions of its members (1)

Learning to Carve

Larissa volunteering at the 2017 festival

Every year, the Canadian Stone Carving Festival raises funds for Innercity Arts. Many young people from the program help out at the festival, including Larissa, who has volunteered her time the past two years. Whether it is shoveling stones, sweeping up dust, or making sure the carvers have enough water – she is always eager to help. She loves talking to the carvers about their creations.

“I wish I could do that!” she told me last year.

Learning to carve with Danny Barber

 

 

 

 

For the first time this year, we used some of the funds raised at the festival to create a bursary, called Freya’s Bursary, which gives youth an opportunity to learn how to carve. Larissa immediately applied for the bursary and put a lot of thought into her application. When I told her she had been chosen as a bursary recipient, she was ecstatic. “I can’t believe it!” she said with a huge smile.  She spent the next 8 weeks attending an Introduction to Stone Carving course at Barber Carving and Sculpture Inc. I visited Larissa at her carving course one night. It was amazing to see her focus, and how comfortable she was using the tools. She was truly in her element and looked so proud of herself. 

We are thrilled that Larissa will be back again at the festival, but not as a volunteer….as a carver! Larissa will be showing off her new skills by carving alongside amateur and professional carvers. Her carving will be up for auction on Sunday July 21st at 2pm at 190 Sparks Street. 

Please come out and show your support! 

Click here for more details! 

 

20190710_155125

Larissa’s first carving!

 

 

A Glimpse into Mental Illness

Damon was downtown one afternoon, when he began to sense the ever too familiar feelings of anxiety and depression taking over: quickening heart beat, pain in stomach, and the overwhelming feeling of dread and despair. Negative thoughts started to race through his mind. He had a few hours before art group and worried these feelings may overwhelm him completely before then. He sat down with his sketch book, and started sketching how he was feeling. He probably sketched more than 10 drawings in one sitting. When he arrived at art group, he told me about his day and what he had been feeling. We flipped though the sketchbook together. His drawings told a story of someone feeling empty, incomplete, and unaccepted.

The sketches were heartbreaking. But the moment was full of hope. Damon has learned over time that his art can be a valuable coping mechanism – a way to express feelings that seem inexpressible. And he has learned that art group is a community that accepts him and values him. He says he looks forward to it each week and that it is one of the only communities he belongs too.

It is an incredibly hopeful moment when someone is vulnerable enough to give a glimpse into their own experience – not because you can fix how they are feeling, but because they just need someone to see it and acknowledge it.

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Mandala Workshop

“Mandalas are an ancient artistic technique used in many cultures around the world as an aid to understanding who we are as individuals and as part of the universe around us. The inside of the circle represents our inner world and the outside represents the outer world.” 

This was the perspective that local artist Claudia Salguere from MASC Ottawa brought to Innercity Arts, where she recently led a workshop on mandalas. Claudia led a calming and meditative workshop, giving each participant identical instructions. Two things struck me by the end of the night: the first, was how peaceful the energy in the room was during this exercise as everyone was focused on their mandala. The second, was how different each persons mandala was despite being given identical instructions and materials. We laid out each mandala at the end of the night and were amazed at the diverse approached each artist brought to the exercise. Thank you Claudia! 

 

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