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Every Life Has A Story

We see and hear a lot as we serve in this ministry. And although we’ve come to expect that everyone’s life story is unique in its twists and turns, that expectation does not prevent us from experiencing surprise or sadness at hearing it.

 

One of these uniquely complex stories involve a gentleman by the name of ‘Jim.’ I have been blessed with the opportunity to help him as he tries to navigate the social system. Difficulties with speech and social skills have opened the door for us at OIM to advocate on his behalf and I see that he is so very pleased that we take the time to listen as he shares his thoughts and ideas.

 

One day while in conversation he started sharing about life in jail. I was really caught off guard as he talked because I just could not equate his gentle and pleasant demeanor to someone who had spent time in jail.

 

I was actually moved with sadness at the thought.

 

You find yourself with certain individuals wishing you could protect them from the harsh realities of their lives. It is always a good thing that you can be touched by someone’s story and not become numb to the lives our street friends live.

-Rick, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless.

 

 

 

Small Gestures

When I speak to new volunteers about what they can expect, I often say that even the smallest gestures – a smile, a conversation, a shoulder to cry on – can mean so much to someone in need.

I was reminded of this recently when a former client called us from Toronto.  She and her husband had been struggling with serious housing and health issues and decided to move to Toronto to be closer to family. While still in Ottawa, they turned to us for basic needs: food, gift cards, personal care.

Quite honestly, at times we felt inadequate to address the seriousness of their problems. What  could our support do to address the bigger complexities of their needs?

Apparently – to my surprise – a lot.

 “OIM,” the wife explained “did more for us than anyone else.”  Puzzled, I stammered, “well, we did very little except to give what we had.” “No, no, you don’t understand,” she insisted. “You were the only ones who supported us through our ordeal.  We had no one.  No one.  I was afraid that one day you would say ‘no more.’  But we kept coming and coming, and you never turned your back. We are so thankful for that.”

I’m still unpacking this today  – amazed, perplexed, reflective.  And I am reminded that only in God’s economy can the smallest of gestures have this kind of impact on people’s lives.

-Jelica, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless.

 

New Perspective on Home

I attend St. Albans Anglican Church in downtown Ottawa. We are lucky to have space in the midst of both the Market, nearby Centretown, and Sandy Hill. We feel as though we are surrounded by busy city life, with event constantly taking place and people coming and going.

It also means our church body lives with neighbours experiencing poverty and homelessness, in fact our church body, itself, has members who find themselves living in shelters or on the streets. It is a stark reality of urban life, and one our congregational is learning to navigate with sensitivity and compassion. It certainly helps that Centre 454, a social service, is located in the lower half of our church building. The folks who work and volunteer there are the same as those you would encounter at OIM–deeply caring and passionate people.

Though we have the pleasure of housing Centre 454 and partnering with them in their ministry, it can be difficult to know how to incorporate our church’s youth into this part of our life together. We have a small but energetic group and as leaders who see Jesus’ strong dedication to social justice we know it is essential to be able to invite our young men, women and children into experiences that can foster understanding.

As a staff member at OIM I knew about our One Homeless Night program, which invites youth to walk for a night in the shoes of one of their peers experiencing homelessness. Though our size did not lend itself to this activity we truly wanted our youth to experience the lessons and principles that this activity offer.

We invited OIM’s Youth Outreach Worker to join us for an evening of discussion, and walk of ‘new perspective’. We traveled around our own neighbourhood, of Sandy Hill, in the rain, trying to see with new insight the individuals and stories of our very own street community. Some of the stories were difficult, and our youth struggled to understand, but more often than not they rose to the occasion with questions and concern. It was unbelievably valuable experience, and one we brought to a close by packing gifts for the Passion 4 Youth participants and, of course, prayer.

It was imperative that we not only see and understand, but that we follow with action.

I hope next year our numbers will grow, or that we might partner with other churches for a full overnight One Homeless Night event. For now, I am grateful that OIM, a place care for dearly, was able to bless my youth with a new perspective for their own homes, and to challenge them how they might invite inclusion and create spaces of safety and support for their neighbours.

 

Selina,

OIM Staff

If you’re interested in organizing a One Homless Night event with your youth group or school visit our One Homeless Night page for more information.

Extra, Extra…Read all about it!

If you haven’t already heard our Youth Outreach Worker was featured recently in a piece by a local journal.

The Ottawa Anglican Journal, CrossTalk, featured our Outrrach Worker Moira Davis in this month’s issue. You can read the piece on our Facebook Page or in the online version of the journal.

Here is a teaser to wet your whistle….

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Moira Profile Photo 2013

If you came across her on the street, you probably wouldn’t notice Moira Davis. She can easily blend into the crowded sidewalks, or be seen whizzing by on her bike. That is, you probably wouldn’t notice Moira if you saw her as she goes about her day off the clock, but the four times a week she is on the streets working you couldn’t miss her in that bright red vest. …