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I Met Jesus This Morning

I-Met-Jesus-This-MorningMiracles never cease to move me, even the little ones. They always catch me by surprise even at this age. This morning, like most mornings, in the car I am talking with God and singing, which isn’t unusual. This morning’s song is, ‘Open the Eyes of my Heart,’ which I sing a lot. 

I make a quick stop at a local fast food restaurant for some food and meet a homeless gentleman at the door. He is panhandling, which is strange for this location. He quietly opens the door for everyone, never saying a word, never making eye contact, just holding out his cup, expectantly hoping. His clothes look clean but they are in rough shape. Everyone rushes in trying to avoid him, but I can’t. I ask him if he is hungry and he looks me in the eye and says, ‘yes.’ 

Inside, I place my order and his and they inform me the grill isn’t open yet. I go and ask him to join me inside. It is obvious the manager isn’t impressed that he is inside, but I ignore him and concentrate on my new friend. I tell him to order whatever he wants and I will pay for it. I add a gift card and hand it to him. 

When I get back to my car, I am weeping. I have to pause because I can’t drive.  My only mistake was not staying to eat with him because of a commitment downtown. I am torn, my years in the military demand that I keep my commitment, that I can’t be late, but my heart is crying for me to stay and get to know this young man. As tears roll down my cheeks in the car, I finally begin to see what I have been asking Christ to reveal to me:  his pain, his loneliness, his hopelessness. My heart aches for him.

Tomorrow, if he is there I will be late for my commitment. Meeting Christ, and my commitment to him, is more important than any other. Honouring my commitment to him starts at the fast food restaurant and having breakfast with this young man. I can’t wait for another encounter tomorrow. I can’t wait to see what the Lord has in store for me then…

~Ken B, Volunteer

 

 

 

Larissa’s Journey: One Final Thank You!

Larissa’s Journey is a blog series featuring one of the young people in the Innercity Arts program that began on November 26, 2018. We hope it offered insight and understanding into the lives of one of the young people in the program. Today’s blog post is a Special Message that comes directly from Larissa’s on-air presentation on Family Radio CHRI, 99.1 FM (airing 8 am and 5 pm). Thanks for listening!

Larissa’s-Journey

Hi, my name is Larissa.

When I think of OIM, I think of faith, unconditional friendship, support, resources, food and a community of really good-hearted Christians trying to do their best.

They made such a difference in my life, and the lives of so many youth in our City!

I hope you will be able to help them continue to do their good work, by making a donation of  any amount.

Every dollar counts, and your prayers and encouragements mean so much.

I hope you have a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous and blessed New Year!

 

 

Larissa’s Journey: Thank You! (Part 2)

Larissa’s Journey is a blog series featuring one of the young people in the Innercity Arts program that began on November 26, 2018. We hope it offered insight and understanding into the lives of one of the young people in the program. Today’s blog post is a Special Message that comes directly from Larissa’s on-air presentation on Family Radio CHRI, 99.1 FM (airing 8 am and 5 pm). Thanks for listening!

Larissa’s-Journey

Hi, my name is Larissa.

It’s been great sharing my story on family radio CHRI.

Thanks for listening and following my story – it really helps me to know that there are people out there who really care about kids on the street. I am grateful that there are people who are willing to listen to my story.

If it wasn’t for the support and friendships I gained at OIM and the art group, I would not be in the place I am in today.  Thanks so much for your support. It really has made a difference in my life, and in the lives of many young people.

I hope you have a great Christmas and a great New Year too.

 

 

Larissa’s Journey: I Met OIM – Choir & Innercity Arts

Larissa’s Journey is a blog series that we hope will offer insight and understanding into the lives of one of the young people in the Innercity Arts program. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. This blog is the more detailed account of Larissa’s on air presentations on Family Radio CHRI, 99.1 FM, each weekday at 8 am and 5 pm. Thanks for listening.

Larissa’s-Journey

How I first met OIM?

Well, there was this girl that used to go to choir, Alisha, and I asked her to come over. In my kitchen, I could only find macaroni and cheese. I didn’t have any money. None.

She said, “I go to this place where they pay me to sing. They also have an art group. If you like, I could call Moira and see if you could go.”

I was like, “Ohh… maybe I could get some free food.” I was so happy, and thought, “Maybe there is a chance for me.” I was on my last straw and did not know what to do. At the same time, I was also nervous, thinking it was not going to be what I thought it would be. Honestly, it was better. It was very organized.”

When I first went to choir, I was really excited, because I thought: “I could become famous.” I was so excited to become famous. Once I tried it out, I thought, “This is awesome.”

That was the beginning.

I got into the choir, and had to go on a waiting list to get into the art group.

I begged Moira to go to the art group, begged for weeks on end.  When an opening came up in the younger “Innercity Arts” program, Moira told me. I asked her about all the details

I was worried that if I came to the art group that I would be judged, thinking they would think I would be in the same place as they were. The youth made me feel like I was a part of everything. They involved me in just about everything. When I come to the Innercity Arts program, it’s like, “Hey everyone! Larissa’s here!”

When I got to the art group, I couldn’t believe how good it was. I loved it. I enjoyed myself. I did really good with fabric art.  Really good! I sell all my fabric art at the art shows we have each spring.

I never felt unwelcome, and though sometimes I got teased, it’s been going well.

Editor: Please stay tuned to Family Radio CHRI 99.1 weekdays at 8 am and 5 pm as Larissa next shares “My Changed Life.” Then come back to this blog and read the full length episode in Larissa’s own words.

 

 

Larissa’s Journey: Early Years in Foster Care

Larissa’s Journey is a blog series that we hope will offer insight and understanding into the lives of one of the young people in the Innercity Arts program. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. This blog is the more detailed account of Larissa’s on air presentations on Family Radio CHRI, 99.1 fm, each weekday at 8 am and 5 pm. Thanks for listening!Larissa’s Journey

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editor: Please stay tuned to Family Radio CHRI 99.1 weekdays at 8 am and 5 pm as Larissa next shares her “Early Years”. Then come back to this blog and read the full length episode in Larissa’s own words. Thanks!

I would wait until my sister was asleep and then I would cry that I could go back to my mom and dad. I wanted to find out who my dad was, but I never did.

When I was 4 ½, I started to go to different homes in foster care. They finally found a home for my sister and me.  My sister and I were made to change our last names to a hyphenated one, because they were maybe going to adopt us, and they didn’t want anyone to know that we were foster kids. I lived there for 9 years.

They didn’t adopt us. My birth mom fought in court that we should not be adopted. The courts never agreed to allow us to be adopted.  When I left home, I was old enough to know what was going on, and I still wanted to go back home.  I felt so all alone.

My sister was with my at this foster home.  I don’t cook. I used to eat eggs and the eggshells too. It all went into the blender. Me and my sister would make concoctions and have an after school snack.

I went to 10 different foster homes after that, until I was 16. It was somebody else’s family, but you were lucky to be there, because it could be far worse. I must have been a really bad kid, because I never stayed at any place for any long time. One place my foster mom threw a knife at me and it stuck into the wall. I called the cops. I even lived in a group home near Spencerville. In that place other kids in the hoe would run away and get rides from truckers.

One home was way out in the country and we had homemade bread, butter, and we had to get wood from outside and bring it in to heat. Mice ran across my bed, and there were rats too. Crazy. I got really sick once and lay on the floor to cool my fever, and they wouldn’t take me to the hospital. I told my social worker but she didn’t do anything about it. Even though I was really sick when we talked, she didn’t do anything.

Some people that had us used us as if we were a trophy when we were in their home.  We’d get gifts to open in front of everyone, for show, then they would return the gifts to the store.

I went to so many different schools, lasted a month maybe. I only have my grade ten. The last school I was at, I lasted only two weeks. I can’t do school any more, I was hit by a bus and hurt my head really bad.  

When I was sixteen, someone from the group home dropped me off at a shelter in Ottawa.

Editor: Please stay tuned to Family Radio CHRI 99.1 weekdays at 8 am and 5 pm as Larissa next shares her “Early Years”. Then come back to this blog and read the full length episode in Larissa’s own words. Thanks!

 

Thank You Value Village!

Thank you for your generosity, Value Village!

OIM receiving donations from Value Village, Kanata, on Hazeldean Rd.

Did you know that for the past few years OIM has been the grateful recipient of clothing and footwear from Value Village in Kanata?

Every second week, OIM Volunteers Judy and Wendy pick up 4 large boxes and/or bags of seasonal clothing and footwear that are promptly delivered to our Tuesday drop-in at Knox Presbyterian Church in downtown Ottawa.

This has been a tremendous blessing for our Drop-In guests!

Each Tuesday, as the doors of our Drop-In open at 10am, the first place many go to is our Clothing Room. Everything is FREE and there is always a line-up to get into the room!

Whether someone is in need of a T-shirt in the summer, a pair of jeans in the fall, or warm coat in the winter, there is often a variety to choose from for young and old alike.  And whether an individual needs their Social Assistance dollars to stretch a bit further or a visitor has nothing but a backpack filled with their worldly possessions, the Drop-In Clothing Room has become a valuable source of help in times of need.

The privilege of being able to give what we have is, in no small measure, due to the generosity of our community of support, among whom is Value Village, Kanata. 

While OIM is ALWAYS in need of clothing and footwear, gladly receiving from the community, it goes without saying that the donations we receive from Value Village are a tremendous help especially in these times as the need on the streets seems only to increase.

This is why we feel especially blessed to be in partnership with Value Village who also partners with other charities in the community through their “Get To Give Program.”

Here is a special note from our Value Village partner in Kanata about this very special program:

Value Village continues to support the Ottawa Innercity Ministries as part of our Get to Give Program. This cycle of giving allows us to take unsold items from our sales floor and distribute them in the community where they’re really needed. Your unwanted goods can do a world of good for our community. Donating your gently- used clothing and household items to support the Ontario Federation of Cerebral Palsy at the Community Donation Centre at the Value Village located at 5487 Hazeldean Road, Kanata; will support their local programs supporting independence, inclusion, choice  and full integration of all persons with Cerebral Palsy. Value Village pays the Ontario Federation of Cerebral Palsy for every item donated.

Drop off hours:

  • Monday to Saturday: 9:00am to 9:00pm
  • Sunday: 10:00am- 7:00pm
  • Ontario Federation of Cerebral Palsy: 1-800-226-8464
  • Value Village (Kanata): 613-836-1549

Our thanks to Value Village for all the good work you do!

 

– Jelica, Staff

 

 

 

Community BBQ

Our Administrative Assistant, Gaby, is normally busy working at the office.  But recently, she had the opportunity to visit our drop-in on BBQ Day!

It was a fun day with plenty of hamburgers, hot dogs, sides, dessert and beverages to go around. Everyone was so appreciative of the community donations that came in so that we could organize this special event for our street community.

Blog post – Gaby

 

Gaby was happy to be there, helping serve, visiting with people, and seeing some of our street friends who visit the office.

I recently asked her about her experience at the drop-in that day, and this is what she said:

“What I sensed was a real community: People know each other, clients, volunteers and staff alike, and genuinely enjoy each other’s company. For some of the ladies there, they told me it’s their only outing. It gives them an opportunity to see their friends and be a part of a caring community.”

I couldn’t have said it better myself.

– Jelica, Staff

Even The ‘Unlovable’

Serving those experiencing poverty and homelessness comes with rewards and challenges.If anyone has spent enough time serving those experiencing poverty and homelessness, you will know it is not for the faint of heart.

I’m not talking about the stories of trauma, tragedy or loss which I have – sadly – come to expect.  No, I’m talking about something a little more delicate.  It’s the experience of not having everyone you help respond in quite the way you’d expect.

On the one side are those individuals who are just so easy to serve. Humble, courteous and kind, they are a joy to be around and I am grateful to know them.  Just a few weeks ago, after praying with one young lady, she blessed me by praying over me and asking God’s favour in my life. A wonderful and unexpected act of kindness.

And then there are those who are not so easy to serve.  

Some individuals can be disruptive, pushy and rude. While others can be downright aggressive. Just a few months ago, not long after welcoming a young man to our drop-in and directing him to our breakfast buffet, I had to ask him to leave for the day because of his aggressive behaviour towards others. Unapologetic, he left while yelling profanities into the crowd. While we always extend grace, we also recognize when a ‘time out’ is essential. 

Not the picture of loving, compassionate service that some may envision.

There is always a tension that’s felt between serving the ‘lovable’ and so-called ‘unlovable.’ It’s inevitable, regardless of the kind of service or mission field one finds oneself in.

But it is often in these moments that I am reminded of my own ‘unlovability.’ Me, whose life is ‘charmed’ by comparison to my street-engaged friends. I am reminded of the times I’ve been unkind, rude and downright mean towards others, family and strangers alike. I can be selfish, impatient, disagreeable, unpleasant, ill-natured, and hurtful towards those who care for me.

These are all true of me:  a professing Christian.

And yet, Jesus chose to love me anyway. Even me, who is unlovable, is loved.  

Go figure.

So in these moments when the difficulties of service are most acute, I am reminded of the unmerited favour I receive daily, and thank God for his example of how to love even the unlovable.  

 

-Jelica, Staff

 

 

Lost, but not forgotten

Double digit forecasts are just ahead as spring casts aside all thoughts of the harshness of freezing rain, below zero winds, and yes, big galoshes and snow shovels. All will soon be lost to the recesses of storage sheds and to memory…

Life is like that at times and people somehow seem to end up in the dark recesses of memory and disappear behind the urgency of the lives that are in the forefront of the current battles.

Kris and Gus come to mind as many of those in this category. They were once at the forefront of the urgency of the seasons of their lives. Struggling with inadequacy and self worth and pains that were buried so deep an excavator could not unearth them. One day they disappeared without a syllable said as to their whereabouts. I have not seen them, but can only hope that they are well.

Not every story ends with a wonderful testimony. It is the reality of what we do here at OIM. But it does not mean that I do not think of them every now and again or pray for their well being.

Please take 30 seconds over the next 30 days to support Kris, Gus and many others who like them have been lost in the deep dark recesses of life. Pray that while yet there is light of day that God, “who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine (Ephesians 3:20)” will meet them where they are.

-Lloyd, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless.