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God of the Ordinary

“Do you have room for one more?” he asked gently.

It was the end of the day at our drop-in and I was getting ready to clean up the Foot Care Station. I had been there for four hours, cleaning and massaging feet. I was tired. My hands ached. “Of course I have room,” I replied. His eyes sparkled with gratitude. I proceeded to fill the foot basin with water, Epsom salts, and soap. He carefully removed his worn shoes and dirty socks, ashamed as he revealed his soiled feet. I pretended not to notice.

Then he soaked his feet and we began to talk.  

We discussed the weather, his ‘job’ collecting empty bottles, and our mutual love of cats.

 Twenty minutes later, his feet had been cleaned, massaged, and clad with a fresh pair of socks. As he got up to leave, he turned to me and said, “y’know, I wasn’t having a very good day, but I just want you to know that you’ve turned my day right around.” He smiled and walked away.

I never saw him again.

Now, 10 years later, I’ve met hundreds from our street community. Yet this brief interaction touches me still. I don’t fully comprehend its impact, but one thing I know for sure:  it has served as God’s reminder that He delights in using ordinary people, engaged in ordinary acts of service to touch people’s lives each and every day.

– Jelica, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds Each Day, In Honour of Our 30th Anniversary

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds – for our ministry’s needs.

Thanks and God Bless You.

 

 

What does volunteering at OIM look like?

Volunteer compassion at OIM.When people ask about what volunteering among the poor looks like, I tell them about Beth:

Beth comes every Wednesday all the way from the outskirts of Ottawa to the downtown core, where she has been volunteering at the Office “Stop In” for 7 years. Our guests from the streets can always expect her to be here each week where she greets them with a ready smile, a cup of coffee, and a chat. It’s encouraging to meet people who find the time to share a part of their busy lives with our guests with the only objective being to give love and support to the most needed here in downtown Ottawa.

It’s not what she does that matters, it’s that she shows up and let’s them know someone cares.

– Gaby, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds a Day, Celebrating 30 Years of Service

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds, in fact – for our ministry’s needs. 

Thank you and God bless.

 

The Hope That Things Can Change

I met ‘Stu’ while on street outreach. Stu has been hardened by the streets and, yet, I know that there is a tender soul underneath.

In our conversations, Stu openly admits to being a heroin addict. He is very pragmatic – almost absolute – in his resolve to continue on this track. I have often been perplexed by the lack of emotion surrounding our conversations, as if a 1950s news reporter was sharing the facts of a distant story. I have tried to impress upon him that there is Someone who cares about him; but these comments were often dismissed without words, almost blocked by his silence.

And, yet, his softer side occasionally slips through.

He has always thanked us and has often dropped subtle hints that he refrains from ‘criminal behaviour’ towards us. It is his way of showing his care and his kindness towards us. I truly believe that there is a wonderful soul under that ‘survival armour.’ I can only pray that through our weekly connections, he will one day open his heart to the hope that things can change.

-Rick, Staff

 

30 Days of Prayer, 30 Seconds a Day, Celebrating 30 Years of Service

This story is part of A Special Series this month in honour of OIM’s 30th Anniversary. We hope to raise awareness, challenge misconceptions, and honestly reflect the lives of those who call the streets their home. As you reflect on these stories, please take a moment to PRAY EACH DAY – just 30 seconds, in fact – for our ministry’s needs.

Thank you and God Bless.

 

Thank you 9th Hour Theatre!

I met Jonathan Harris back in 2011, when I was looking for someone to come to the art group to do a theatre workshop. He told me all about his theatre company, 9th Hour Theatre, which used the performing arts to explore faith. I was immediately stuck by how warm and open he was, and how passionate he was about theatre. Soon after, he came to Innercity Arts and did a theatre workshop. He taught the youth about storytelling, and encouraged them all to ‘tell their story’. It was a powerful workshop.

Almost immediately, Jonathan could tell there was something special about Innercity Arts. He did not need to be convinced, he could see the value in what we were doing. He eventually became a mentor in our program and began attending each week. The youth were immediately drawn to the same openness and warmth I had seen in him.

This year, Jonathan told me that we wanted to do more for the art program. He said, “I don’t have a lot of money, but I do have a theatre company.” He decided to use what he had to do as much good as possible.

He told me his plan to raise funds for OIM after each performance of Godspell, the musical 9th Hour would be performing at Centrepointe Theatre. He set a goal to raise $5000, which truthfully I thought was a little ambitious! Well, they surpassed their goal and raised $6,718.29!

All of us here at OIM were blown away by both the talent we saw at Godspell, and the generosity of 9th Hour Theatre.

On a personal note, I feel inspired by Jonathan Harris. Sometimes, it’s easy for me to think that I do not have the resources to make a difference. But Jonathan is proof that if you use what you have, you can do so much good.   

We want to thank Jonathan Harris, for his continued support of OIM. We also want to thank the board of 9th Hour Theatre, the talented cast and crew  of Godspell and for everyone who came out to attend the show.  

I encourage you all to keep your eyes open for 9th Hour’s next production. You can follow them here.

 

 

The Kindness of Human Contact

On a recent family vacation to BC, we witnessed polite but dishevelled panhandlers plying their trade amidst the more decidedly destitute segment of the population, all passive against the throb of the downtown core of that province’s largest city.

In front of the exquisite old railway station and among the edgy new commercial buildings, we found them.

Similarly I saw disadvantaged people in Cincinnati and Shreveport.

They seem to stand out, as icons of another world in which, save for circumstances and choices, we too could share. Perhaps it’s the starkness of winter in the cold and grey inner city landscape that makes them more noticeable.

The homeless are systemic to the “human condition” for a variety of reasons. But few are on the streets because they want to be.

Some are victims, sometimes avoidably so. Many are mentally or emotionally challenged.

However, the vast majority of our street friends silently long to engage in an authentic relationship with someone who cares.

We help simply by lending an ear or sharing a kind word during short encounters on the streets of our nation’s capital.

It takes only a few moments, yet it soothes an ache that only those of us who understand and are willing can relieve.

God’s love, as demonstrated by the kindness of human contact, inspires hope.

Simply being a small part of a less fortunate person’s day can make an immeasurable difference in their lives.

 

1 Corinthians 14 verse 13: “Three things will last forever – faith, hope and love – and the greatest of these is love.”

 

Peter, Street Outreach Volunteer

 

 

An Unexpected Encounter

I want to share a short, but quite wonderful, blessing I received from my street-engaged friend named ‘Bob.’

When you are on the streets, you are surrounded by many difficult stories and so much pain, so when a blessing erupts in your ministry it’s an amazing thing. The feeling you get is that of God just dropping a wonderful nugget in your lap to bless you.

Bob is a friend I first met at out drop-in and we also had a few connections at our stop-in. We had talked and shared during these times and things unfolded as many connections do. We at OIM, as always, helped where we could with Bob’s needs. I eventually lost contact with him for several months, so I just had to be content with the fact that I was able to plant or water by being a supportive connection point in his life.

Now, several months later, I am sitting in a coffee shop and who comes over, but Bob! Out of the blue he tells me how his life has changed and he thanked us for being there for him. He then proceeds to pray over me, declaring a blessing and favour, as powerful as any prophetic word received.

So I just want to honour God for dropping such a wonderful blessing in seeing the fruit of the increase he has brought to someone’s life and in knowing the small part I played in that. These are part of the moments that regenerate your tanks and strengthen your resolve. I pray that God continues to grow and stretch my friend Bob, and that the fruit of his boldness to pray for and share what the Lord has done for him, only increases in his life. 

 

Rick, Staff

 

 

A Homeless Vet’s Journey: Hear Kurk In His Own Words, Part 2

Hard times. At all times. It’s not one ‘bad thing’ but it is often a series of one bad thing after another and then another and then another, with no time to regroup and gather strength, and no support to help you through.

No support to help you through… unless someone steps up!

OIM staff and volunteers step up on a regular basis to help and support people who are struggling to survive.

Although there is still much to be done, click the play button below to listen to Kurk’s final thoughts after coming through on the other side of this leg of his journey:

 

Hear Kurk’s Final Thoughts on his Journey So Far. You Won’t Want to Miss it! –>

 

Kurk’s  Final Message.

 

Please consider giving a special Holiday Gift to help us continue to reach out, help and support people just like Kurk.  To donate, please click on the link below:

 

DONATE NOW

 

(If you missed the start of this 10-Part blog series, click on the link below to start reading. It’s a journey you will not forget – Be careful though – it just might change your life!)

A Homeless Vet’s Journey: Week 1

 

 

 

A Homeless Vet’s Journey: Hear Kurk In His Own Words, Part 1

The lives and stories of people on the streets are dark and difficult. Like watching a  bad B- grade movie – circumstances and events happen and  you can hardly believe a human being could endure, and live to tell the tale.

Our Christmas Story this year took us on a journey with Kurk, a homeless Vet, who lost everything. We walked alongside him as he tried to get back on his feet after losing everything in a fire in 2013. Together we got to see what it’s really like to navigate our social services  system: feeling his pain, experiencing his disappointment, and discovering the strength and stamina he found to stay the course.

Click the play button below and listen to Kurk’s final thoughts after coming through on the other side of his journey: 

 

 

Hear the rest of Kurk’s message –>  A Homeless Vet’s Journey – episode 9

 
 
Please consider giving a special Christmas Gift to help us continue to reach out, help and support people just like Kurk. Click on the Link Below to Donate:
 
DONATE NOW

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Homeless Vet’s Journey: Week 4

To hear the audio introduction to A Homeless Vet’s Journey – Week 4, click the play button below:

Monica, from Catherine McKenna’s office, invited Kurk and I to her office to talk about how they might help.  Upon hearing Kurk’s story, Monica immediately confirmed that Kurk should be receiving his money from CPP. She promised to make a call.

Given that his bank account had been frozen, Kurk and I had agreed that he needed to provide a new address that would guarantee the safe delivery of his money from CPP. We did this and Monica said the money should come without any problem, probably within a week. Kurk and I completed the change of address forms and Monica faxed it to Service Canada.

We quickly discovered that Kurk’s complete lack of id was still a major problem.

In order to receive his Old Age Pension and his superannuation, Kurk would have to provide proof of citizenship. Two applications would have to be completed: first a ‘Verification of Status’ and second, a confirmation of Canadian Citizenship. Kurk had no identification, not even a library card. Nothing.

He was and is a Canadian citizen, and has served his country in the military, but there was no proof. Proof of identity is needed in order to access his two other sources of income (Old Age Pension and Superannuation).

When he gets his proof of identity, Kurk is eligible for eleven months of back pay from both Old Age Pension and Superannuation!  He will be able to sustain his own apartment when he achieves this goal!

We talked about the possibilities, and since Kurk had immigrated to Canada when he was ten, we thought we could contact the <Europian>  Embassy here in Ottawa, and find out how to obtain a copy of his birth certificate.

Kurk gave me written permission to act in his behalf.

Ken MacLaren, Executive Director

Comment: Kurks’ journey is complicated by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (from his time in the military), and this is a challenge for him, along with the challenges of trying to navigate the ‘system’. He is 70 years old, a Veteran, and in need – and this is just the beginning of the journey! Would you consider giving a gift to help us continue to reach out to those in need this Christmas? Thanks for your support!

(Kurk’s Journey is a 10-Part Series.  Stay tuned for Part 4)

 

 

A Homeless Vet’s Journey: Week 2

To hear the audio introduction to A Homeless Vet’s Journey – Week 2, click play below:

Taking Kurk aside, I asked him about the money that the government owed him. He told me that he was owed money from Canada Pension, Old Age Pension and Superannuation.  He said that they had frozen his bank account and he was not receiving any money, and in fact, had not received any money for over two months.

I was not sure how to proceed with this, so I picked up my phone and called my friend, Ron Petersen from McMillan LLP, and passed the phone to Kurk. After 40 minutes Kurk returned the phone to me, and Ron told me that Kurk did not need a lawyer, but suggested he might get some help from Catherine McKenna, Member of Parliament for Ottawa Centre. I phoned McKenna’s office immediately.

Monica, from Catherine McKenna’s office was more than helpful as she listened to Kurk’s story and offered to help. We set up an appointment and started the process of Kurk’s claim.

Kurk had lost all of his identification in a fire in 2013. All of it!  He never had the where-with-all to have it replaced, for any number of reasons: capacity, money (it costs to replace identity), and support.

He was staying at the Salvation Army shelter. His bank account, where once he had been receiving direct deposits from Canada Pension Plan had been frozen. I eventually found out why: Kurk had tried to access his account on a number of occasions from different ATMs to see if his money had been deposited. Each inquiry cost $3.  So, because he had a negative balance of $21 ( seven inquiries at $3 each), his account was suspended/frozen, and the deposits stopped.

Ken MacLaren, Executive Director

Imagine if this had happened to you, what do you think you would do?

What would you do if your were in Kurk’s position? A homeless veteran with absolutely no support, and no resources.

Please leave us a comment below. 

(Kurk’s Journey is a 10-Part Series.  Stay tuned for Part 3)