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A Homeless Vet’s Journey: Week 6

To hear the audio introduction to A Homeless Vet’s Journey – Week 6, click the play button below:

When we spoke with Monica at Catherine McKenna’s office, she realized that there were some pieces of the puzzle where even she needed help. (!)  She asked us to accompany her next door to Yasir Naqvi’s office, Member of Provincial Parliament for Ottawa Centre.

Kurk and I did so, and met Jessica who was most helpful. Fortunately Kurk had memorized his OHIP number and relayed this information to Jessica. She agreed to look into Kurk’s case and see what she could discover.

Our visit was on Week 4, and on Week 6, she sent an email with an attachment of a temporary, but valid, OHIP document. This is THE FIRST PIECE OF I.D., and it’s good news! (There is no photo, so it is limited, but it works for health care!)

A note was attached to this document, “Mr. Kurk cannot convert to a photo health card until he has an original citizenship document.”  This means we can use this with the immigration application in place of one of the pieces of ID (in theory at least).

Also, on Week 6  I received an email from Cathering McKenna’s office that reads as follows: “Service Canada has received the change of address letter and the cheque for a retroactive amount of CPP is due to be reissued and sent out shortly”.

Finally, some good news!

Ken MacLaren, Executive Director

Please leave a Comment: It seem to be one thing after another for our friends on the streets. Imagine how difficult this would be – entitled to money that is rightfully yours, and then wandering homeless, wondering when, if ever, there will be some action taken on your behalf. Have you ever experienced this kind of long-term bureaucracy? Would you consider making a special Christmas gift to help us continue our outreach in the downtown core? Thanks for your support!

 

(Kurk’s Journey is a 10-Part Series.  Stay tuned for Part 6)

 

A Homeless Vet’s Journey: Week 5

To hear the audio introduction to A Homeless Vet’s Journey, click the play button below:

We drove downtown and found the location of the Embassy. We were given a piece of paper with instructions on how to obtain a baptismal certificate.

With all the fandangling and hoops that we have had to negotiate, it was a sure relief to at last find something straight forward and simple!

Here are the instructions from the Embassy: “For a copy of your <Europian> birth certificate please contact the church where your birth was registered. If you do not have that information, please contact the Ministry of Ecclesiastical Affairs in <Europe>. Make sure to include all the information you have about your birth.”

Finally! Some concrete help!

Kurk could not remember the town or parish where he was baptised, so we called the telephone number listed on the helpful sheet of paper from the Embassy in Ottawa.

The first number, the one listed, did not help. They redirected to another number.

(Note 1: It is a six hour time delay between Canada and <Europe>

Note 2: It appears that the parish offices are operational only for a few hours a few days of the week.

Note 3: Surprise! <Europe> parishes and offices speak <Europian>! ALL answering machines in <Europian> only).

This number, when I finally got through, directed me to another number. When I found someone who actually spoke enough English to give me some help, he just said, “No.”

I thought that he did not understand my request, so I politely reworded. Again, he said, “No.”

Hard to believe. I tried a third time to explain the dilemma that Kurk could not acquire any monies until he had two sources of identification, one of which was the birth certificate in question, and once again said, “No,” and promptly hung up the telephone.

Another number and, of course, I was redirected to yet another number, where finally we found the parish where Kurk was baptised, and after listening to our request, they informed me that they would send an email with the copy of the Birth Certificate, to the Embassy in downtown Ottawa.

Eight weeks later, we are still waiting…

Ken MacLaren, Executive Director

Comment: The ‘waiting’ part – let’s consider that for a moment. Waiting for Kurk is very UNlike any waiting that most of us have done. Kurk is now living ‘in the rough’, on the streets, sleeping in doorways out of the wind (when possible) – and he is 70! He moves during the day from program to program – all the while he is eligible for money that is his due. Not welfare or Ontario Disability, but Canada Pension, Old Age Pension, and superannuation – all of which he has earned and every right to! The clock ticks on…

Would you consider making a special Christmas gift to help us with our Street Outreach program? We are there seven days a week, connecting with those in need. Thanks for your support!

 

(Kurk’s Journey is a 10-Part Series.  Stay tuned for Part 5)

 

Ottawa Home and Garden Show. Why?

OIM has been given a booth at the Ottawa Home and Garden Show, March 20 to 23 at the Ernst and Young Centre.  Why?

A friend of the ministry donated this 10’ x 20’ exhibitor’s space so that people who are thinking about renovating, redoing and re-fixing their own homes might take a moment and consider people who don’t have any home at all.

Our booth will have an area where visitors can see some of the art work that our Passion 4 Youth artists have created; we will be showing the 7 minute OIM DVD and also another shorter DVD featuring interviews from three of the youth from the program; we will have a visual aid of a home (on Bristol board) where visitors can buy a brick for a donation of any amount, and we can collect funds for new space (which we desperately need).

Then we’ll top it off with not one, but two (and maybe three) surprises that you can only discover if you come by and have a visit with us.

The Ottawa Home and Garden people are expecting over 20,000 visitors to the show this year, and it is a privilege to represent OIM there.  We have scheduled volunteers and staff for the entire weekend, and you will want to see how this works!

Please consider this your special invitation: ‘Come on down’ and visit us!

The Small Things Guy…

Following from last week, my friend ‘Jesse’, the ‘small things guy’.

So last week at the drop in, I had to call the police and ask them to remove Jesse as he would not cooperate and leave when I asked him.  The reason?  He was drinking (no surprise) openly (not allowed) and blatantly (not allowed) and was not showing respect to the church where we house our drop in (the biggest offense), neither did he respect the staff and volunteers who make things work.

I was hurt – OK, so I know it’s not about me – but it pained me that my ‘friend’, who in his last letter from jail called me his ‘Best Friend’ walked and stomped all over me (not literally) and our friendship (I thought).

He left the premises last week only when Ottawa’s finest escorted him out – no problem.

So my week goes on and I think about Jesse a lot, and our friendship, and wonder how badly it’s been violated.  Then I’m looking through my shirts and I find one that I think Jesse would like and bring it to the drop in, thinking I would meet him there today.

On the way it struck me that Jesse would not remember even one of the details of our encounter last week.  Nothing.

Staff called to tell me he had arrived at the drop in and I came shortly afterwards.

We connected.  I gave him a shirt.  He liked it. I told him I loved him, and he knew that.  I told him he was not respectful last week and I had to call the police.  What?? he said. Didn’t remember a thing.  Truly.  We hung out for a while and he said he would help me with the memorial service to come later that day.  It was a new day. Fresh start. My Best Friend.  Again.

So what to do?  Life goes on.  Hold things lightly.  Hold others with a firm grasp.  Never let go of hope.  Never give up on people.  Love unconditionally – people need to be loved.

Question: What about the seventy times seven plus one? Does love ever draw the line?

PS (and unrelated): It’s not too late to join our Urban Intervention Training for new volunteers: next session Feb 6. 2014

The Small Things

Someone gave me a gift of money and instructed to help someone. Nothing came to mind immediately so I tucked it away- and took it out again when Jesse called me from jail.  Not a friend in the whole world, although Jesse has been just about everywhere.  Chronically homeless, he finally got a place some months ago, and his place was secure as it was paid immediately through Welfare.

I bought him a pair of jeans, underwear and gathered some other stuff from our donation pile.  I had $15 left, and knowing that Jesse would never have anyone give him any money for tuck, deposited it in his account.  I didn’t have an appointment so we could not visit, so I dropped the stuff off and left.

Then I got the letter.

Here are excerpts:

Hi Ken. Thank you for everything you did.  I was surprize with the cloth and picture… You Didn’t have to leave me money. you. God Bless… Say Hi to everybody for me. Your pray save my life… thank you for Helping me out, when I ask you went out of your way to bring me the thing I needed.  I was so surprize, Happy (Tears) came Rolling down my  Face.  the Guard ask me Jesse you (OK) I say I am in (Heaven)… you are my Best Friend who care you go out of your way and I thank yo. You Best Friend (Jesse)

No big deal for most of us… but these small things, thoughtful gifts, acts of kindness make a lasting and significant impact on the lives of our friends (even Best Friends!).

Question: How has a ‘little kindness’ you’ve done, make a lasting impact?  Briefly, tell me about it…

A Place of Second Chances

I remember very clearly the day when Vern spoke up to support another guy who messed up.  The guy stole something from our office, and we were trying to piece together what had happened.

Vern said, “Of all places I know, this is a place of second chances.”

That statement says so much: it is a recognition of who we are, and how we are perceived; it is a reflection of how God deals with each of us, regardless of our circumstances and position in life; and it is a reminder of our own shortcomings as we reach out to those in need.

This realization that we (staff, volunteers and all of us for that matter) are not that much different from our street friends, ‘levels the playing field’ and shows our humanity, humility and vulnerability.  Additionally, it allows us to connect with people at all levels with a compassion and understanding that is characteristic of our ministry.  Second chances are for all of us.

I sat in the stairwell as my friend Henry sadly reflected on his current place in life, and I listened.  I didn’t have much to say, but I could listen.  After a while, Henry looked at me with a sideways glance, slapped his hand on his thigh and with a guffaw said, “You’re just like me aren’t you?  You are just like me!”

We walk alongside people experiencing poverty and homelessness and we do what we can to help and listen and care.  We soon come to realize that we are no better than anyone, with our failings and fallings, our own shortcomings and challenges: we too look for a place for ‘second chances’.

Question: When did you last need a second chance?

Consider becoming a part of this ministry: Volunteer Training starts January 30, 2014!

A Treatise on the Term “Pro-Life”

A treatise from one of our volunteers, George, on individuals who focus on the Pro-Life debate. He discusses the real depth of the term, and how it has been given a two-dimensional definition.

Many individuals in the church like to say that they are “Pro-Life”, which is an interesting phrase to use. The term “Pro-Life”, to me, means so much more than protecting the right of a foetus.

“Pro-life” means ensuring all children are well-fed, protected and educated.

“Pro-life” means ensuring the most vulnerable in society are adequately protected;

“Pro-life” means ensuring adequate housing for all (people experiencing homelessness have a life expectancy up to 40 years less than the housed);

“Pro-life” means renouncing the violence that permeates our culture;

“Pro-life” means promoting social justice and opposing capital punishment everywhere;

“Pro-life” means loving all your neighbours, the rich and poor, Canadians and foreigners;

“Pro-life” means promoting a society where all human life has greater value than consumer products;

“Pro-life” promoting a society that reduces the incidences of unwanted pregnancies (Two major factors strongly associated with increased unwanted pregnancies include lack of access to contraception and sex-education);

“Pro-life” means valuing both the life of the foetus and the mother;

And, finally…,

“Pro-life” means believing all human life is God given, precious and equal.

 

I lost a piece of my heart…

Today I lost another piece of my heart.  That’s what I feel when I meet someone who just makes me want to weep.

Today I met Constantine….a proud man with a proud name.  He tells me he is seventy years young.  He tells me he is a descendant of Constantine the Great.  He is Romanian he says and has been here for many years, fleeing persecution in his native land.  He says his family left behind is better off without him, he must leave so they can be safe.  He tells me he has been here for many years but has only been on the streets a few months.  He says that mold was discovered in his apartment, that it was making him sick but no one did anything about it.  He tells me he suffered a small stroke and that scared him.  He left his apartment, for good.  Now he’s on the streets.  He has trouble finding food that he can eat because he can’t cook on the streets and his doctor has told him to not eat salt as it’s making him sick.  His legs are swollen from water retention.  He prays.  He thanks God he says every morning when he wakes up.  Thanks Him that he made it through another night.  He’s cold.  He’s wearing three jackets and three scarves today but he is still cold.  He says he has lost about fifty pounds since September, since he’s been on the streets.  He says he has hope though.  He’s pretty sure he’ll be getting another place in a couple of weeks.  He prays it is mold free.  I pray it is too Constantine.

There is something wrong with this world when we allow a seventy year old man with multiple health issues to sleep on the street.

Today I lost another piece of my heart.  I think maybe God did too……

God’s hands on a cold night…

This past Wednesday, Ottawa experienced what I hope was the last winter storm of the year (fingers crossed!). It was windy, snowy and wet. Buses were cancelled and everyone was warned to stay off the messy roads.

But that night, I was scheduled to do outreach from 9-midnight. I would love to tell you that I am a really tough/super-amazing outreach worker who is always motivated to walk the streets to do God’s work.-but that’s just not true. Last Wednesday I was exhausted, and the last thing I wanted to do was walk around the empty streets of Ottawa in a storm. In fact, I was secretly hoping that Jeff, my outreach partner, would cancel so I could stay in my nice warm apartment. But he didn’t, so I dragged myself to the office to do outreach.

We did our normal outreach route down Elgin and throughout the market. The streets were mostly empty and quiet. (When the weather is really bad our street friends are much harder to find. Not because they are in a safe, warm place, but because they are anywhere that is an escape from the elements)

On our way back to the office, I was dreaming about the hot shower I would have when I got home, when we heard “Hey outreach!” It was Laura and Kelsey, two youth who I have met a few times on outreach.

Neither had jackets. Neither had boots. Both were soaking wet. “Do you guys have any sleeping bags?” they asked.

We didn’t have any with us, but we told them they could come back to the office with us to get some. They walked back with us to the office, and we learned that they had both been kicked out of their places so they had nowhere to go. There was no space in the youth shelter and both refused to go to the adult shelter, saying they were too scared. Instead, they were going to sleep outside.

They warmed up in the office and changed into dry socks. We gave them food and sleeping bags, and they thanked us over and over before leaving to go find a dry place to sleep.

It was easy for me to give myself a pat on the back that night. “Good job Moira! It’s a good thing you braved the elements so you could help those girls.” Then it occurred to me that I was giving myself a whole lot of credit. When really, God has these two girls in his hands and He will take care of them. He may have used me and Jeff that night, but if we had not done outreach God would have taken care of those girls. And this does not make me feel like I am not needed, but rather reassured God will take care of his children.

 

OIM goes to the Oscars!

Ok…OIM didn’t actually GO to the Oscars…but the film that won ‘Best Documentary Short’ is the story of Inocente Izucar, a street-artist who was living on the streets of San Deigo at the age of 15.  This documentary features a young woman who uses brilliant colours and unique art pieces to rise out of the challenging life on the streets to pursue her dreams of becoming a professional painter.  After watching the trailer, I am anxious to watch the full feature….a story of hope and redemption.  Perhaps you will add it to your movie list too.

Our Passion 4 Youth Fine Arts Program has many talented young people who are experiencing this story of hope and redemption.  It is a place for street-engaged youth to experience their true value…to feel the power that comes from knowing that you have a part to play in this world.  If you aren’t familiar with this exciting program, look on our website in the lower right-hand corner.  Some of these amazing youth are featured in our Faces Of  OIM.  See what hope looks like…

-Kim